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Showing posts by: Tessa Bailey click to see Tessa Bailey's profile
Fri
Dec 9 2016 9:30am

H&H Quickie #18: Tessa Bailey Presents “Penalty Kiss”

Wound Tight by Tessa Bailey

Today we're thrilled to welcome Tessa Bailey (author of Wound Tight) back to Heroes and Heartbreakers with a very titilating scene that we know will leave you wanting more!

Last month, we asked you to offer suggestions (“prompts”) as inspiration for a short original scene, and you blew us away with a ton of great prompts.

Here are the prompts she chose for (with thanks to everyone who left a suggestion, because there were so many fantastic options):

Prompts chosen:

Now, without further ado... Tessa Bailey's “Penalty Kiss”

Jessie just needed to finish one measly little chapter. Was that really so much to ask?

Of course, her brother had arrived twenty minutes earlier than planned to drive them to the Rangers game, forcing her to stop smack dab in the middle of a sexy scene. Not just any sexy scene, though. The one she’d stuck with a trilogy to reach!

Oh hell no. Not happening. Desperate times called for desperate measures. So with Kindle in hand, Jessie stomped through Madison Square Garden searching for a quiet place to hide. Two elevator trips and one hot pretzel later, she’d stumbled on the perfect spot. The door was even marked PRIVATE. It had to be fate, right?

[Read more...]

Tue
Mar 17 2015 11:15am

5 Awesomely Unique Heroine Professions in Romance from Cunning, Cole, Roberts, and More!

Chase Me by Tessa BaileyToday we are pleased to welcome to the site Tessa Bailey, whose first Broke and Beautiful novel, Chase Me, just hit shelves and features a heroine with a very interesting day job. Of course, this just begged for a discussion about heroines in fascinating professions all across the genre. Thanks for joining us to share some of your favorites, Tessa!

Sniper, financial analyst, food critic, pool hustler. When creating a stand-out heroine, the possibilities truly are endless. Furthermore, a heroine’s profession gives insight into her character, before she’s even been introduced on the page. Perhaps the author will turn that preconceived notion on its head at some point, but in doing so they only lend more insight. Maybe as a reader, we thought we had that kindergarten teacher pegged, but she really dreams of opening her own rock climbing gym. Or perhaps, like my character Roxy Cumberland in Chase Me, your heroine is unemployed and has been reduced to delivering singing telegrams.

Over the years, I’ve had the privilege of meeting (reading) some heroines who move within very specific circles and I’ve listed some below that stood out to me in particular.

Glassblower (Born in Fire by Nora Roberts): As with any of Nora Robert’s books, you walk away with an understanding of the professions she gives her characters—the process, the drawbacks, etc. and this book is no different. Another Nora book that stood out to me in this regard is Chasing Fire, where the heroine is a smoke jumper in Missoula, Montana. Such a kickass character with the kind of convictions and bravery necessary in such a profession.

[If you could have any job for a day, what would it be?...]

Tue
Nov 26 2013 9:30am

Location, Location, Location: How Setting’s As Important As Character

Asking for Trouble by Tessa BaileyToday, author Tessa Bailey joins us to talk the importance of location. In her new release, Asking for Trouble, the hero and heroine have to be in the same place because their best friends are getting married—even though they can't stand each other. Or so they think...thanks for being here, Tessa!

A peaceful New England seashore. Post-apocalyptic London. A gritty, crime-infested Brooklyn neighborhood. The setting of a story can shape the tone, the plot and especially the journey your character takes. If a hero and heroine come face to face in a dimly-lit subway car, will the story have the same outcome as if they had met at the launch of the Space Shuttle? Unlikely. More than that, though, the story will feel different. Location transports the reader to a specific place where they will hear certain sounds, imagine the scent in the air, sense danger or even excitement.

One of the more memorable settings for a book in my recent memory is in Karen Marie Moning’s Iced. We are Dublin, Ireland, “After the Wall Crash,” meaning the invisible barrier separating human from Fae no longer exists. Human life has been lost, leaving the once lively streets of Dublin empty. Gutted. When I read this book, and I imagined our fourteen-year-old heroine, Dani, walking through looted stores, decaying buildings and holing up in abandoned homes, I could see it. I could sense the danger and sadness in every step she took through the decimated city. In this particular book, Dublin was a character all on its own. Around every corner was a new surprise, an event waiting to happen and it made the location feel like a living, breathing entity.

[Can you picture it?...]