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Showing posts by: Amy Helmes click to see Amy Helmes's profile
Fri
Jan 24 2014 2:30pm

As You Like It: Shakespeare’s Still the King of Pop Culture

Anyone But You by Kim Askew and Amy HelmesToday we're joined by Kim Askew and Amy Helmes, authors of the Twisted Lit series of Shakespeare-inspired YA novels. Their latest release, Anyone But You, is a modern twist on Romeo and Juliet. They're here to demonstrate why Shakespeare remains oh so relevant today. Thanks, Kim and Amy!

As authors of the Twisted Lit series of Shakespeare-inspired YA novels, it’s easy for us to find Shakespeare in unexpected places. Pay attention, and you’ll start to see that his timeless works are front-and-center in some of today's most popular books, films, and TV series, including a few of our favorites, below.

Rainbow Rowell's Eleanor & Park

“Parting is such sweet sorrow…”

Read Rainbow Rowell’s YA bestseller and you’ll get a dose of Romeo and Juliet. Not only do the title characters read the play in class—(Eleanor had some cynical remarks about the star-crossed lovers)—but their own bittersweet (and in many ways, forbidden) romance has strong parallels to Shakespeare’s teen tragedy.

[Shakespeare really is all around...]