Wed
Jan 4 2017 9:01am

What Has Been the Most Accurate Description of Love?

Source: sensualquotes.tumblr.com

 In romance, we're surrounded by proclamations of love and we slowly see our favorite characters fall in love and lust. For those of you who read it, this quote from The Fault in Our Stars quickly became iconic. It was beautiful and it was real, and it was beautiful in its realness. Have you ever read a book and thought “yes, this is what love feels like” or what love should feel like? Have you found a quote that perfectly sums it up? 

Tell me about it in the comments! 

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8 comments
Jen Wattley
1. JenWattley
For me, it'll always be P&P that captures it so well: “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
Karen A. Wyle
2. Karen A. Wyle
From Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land (approximate quote): that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own.
flmom1957
4. flmom1957
This is rather lengthy but after almost 30 years of marriage, it explains the best..."To love someone is like moving into a house," Sonja used to say, "At first you fall in love in everything new, you wonder every morning that all this belongs to you, as if fearing that someone will suddenly come rushing through the door and say that there has been a terrible mistake, you weren't supposed to live in a wonderful place like this. Then over the years the walls become weathered, the wood splinters here and there, and you start to love that house not so much because of all its perfections, but rather for its imperfections. You get to know all the nooks and crannies. How to avoid getting the key caught in the lock when it's cold outside. Which floorboards flex slightly when one steps on them or exactly how to open the wardrobe doors without them creaking. These are the little secrets that make it your home." Fredrik Bachman, A Man Called Ove
Karen A. Wyle
5. bandersnatch
There is a scene in Emma Bull's War for the Oaks where the heroine (Eddi) asks the hero how he knows it's love he's feeling. I've always thought his response is pretty great.

"I’ve no surety that it is. I know only parts of what I feel; I may be misnaming the whole. You dwell in my mind like a household spirit. All that I think is followed with, ‘I shall tell that thought to Eddi.’ Whatever I see or hear is colored by what I imagine you will say of it. What is amusing is twice so, if you have laughed at it. There is a way you have of turning your head, quickly with a little tilt, that seems more wonderful to me than the practiced movements of dancers. All this, taken together, I’ve come to think of as love, but it may not be.
It is not a comfortable feeling. But I find that, even so, I would wish the same feeling on you."
BrenWill3
6. BrenWill3
Love this question! And love all of the above, (especially P&P!)
There are so many lines that have got me....
Not to negate the importance of sentimentality ('cause it's absolutely important) but additionally for me (and mine) this line just does it for me "“She may be an evil bitch, but she is my evil bitch , and I'll have no other." Kresley Cole - Kiss of a Demon King.
It's just so ...right...to point out that absolute love (in my opinion) is acknowledging the good and the bad about someone and still loving them for it. Plus it's freakin' funny...and that adds to it all too!
Janga
7. Janga
I have always liked the simplicity and clear-eyed view of Frederica Merrivale's words to Alverstoke:

It has always seemed to me that if one falls in love with any gentleman one becomes instantly blind to his faults. But I am not blind to your faults, and I do not think that everything you do or say is right. Only--Is it being--not very comfortable--and cross--and not quite happy when you aren't there?

Of course, there is something to be said as well for Alverstoke's claim that he knows he loves Frederica because she is the only woman who has never bored him.

And I love Venetia's lines from Sherry Thomas's Ravishing the Heiress. Venetia, Fitz’s sister and heroine of Beguiling the Beauty says to Millie, who has paraphrased with some bitterness Byron’s claim that “Friendship is Love without his wings”: “No, my dear Millie, you are wrong. Love without friendship is like a kite, aloft only when the winds are favorable. Friendship is what gives love its wings.”
Karen A. Wyle
8. Melissa Hollister
I love the quote from "Ravishing the Heiress" above....it is perfect. Comparing love to a kite in favorable winds...
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