Tue
Aug 12 2014 7:11am

Happy Birthday, George IV!

The Voluptuary

The man who lent his era to the most popular period in historical romance, the Regency, was born today back in 1762. King Geoge IV was acting Prince Regent for his father, George III, who was incapacitated due to madness (now thought perhaps to be porphyria).

George, as Regency readers likely know, was excessive in many things, from love affairs to spending to food and more. But his excesses had some positive results; he was a strong proponent of the arts, including painting, architecture, and literature. The Regency era produced such artists as William Coleridge, William Blake, the Shelleys (Mary and Percy), Lord Byron, John Keats, and more. 

Many historical authors have put George in as a character in their books*, including Georgette Heyer, Mary Robinette Kowal, Loretta Chase, Barbara Hazard, Sophia Nash, Kieran Kramer, Sabrina Jeffries, Suzanne Enoch, Mary Jo Putney, Gaelen Foley, and more.

In what book did you first meet the birthday boy?
 

*Thanks for all the help from Twitter friends!

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4 comments
Carmen Pinzon
1. bungluna
I'm pretty sure my introduction to Regency England was in a Barbara Cartland book. I'm also sure Prinny made an appearance somewhere along the way.

I confess to being confused by the duality of the Prince as a character. In some novels he's the young, beautiful renaissance man, as in Baroness Orczy's "The Scarlet Pimpernel". In others, he's the foppish butterball toddling after older ladies.
Megan Frampton
2. MFrampton
@bungluna, I think both are true--when he was younger, he was a stylish Renaissance man; as he got older, he became more self-indulgent, so he was still a patron of the arts, but he was also vain, excessive, and selfish, with mommy issues (I'm guessing), so he was that foppish butterball. But his legacy in spurring on the arts remains solid.
Maddie Grove
3. Maddie Grove
A Courtesan's Scandal by Julia London! He's a pretty bad guy there.
Kareni
4. Kareni
My guess would either be a Barbara Cartland book or one by
Georgette Heyer.
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