Tue
Apr 3 2012 6:32am

E.L. James’s Fifty Shades of Grey Out Today in Print!

E.L. James’s Fifty Shades of Grey

Today, E.L. James’s Fifty Shades trilogy is available in print at an affordable price, and early estimates at its first print run are around 750,000 copies. And that’s after it hit bestseller lists based on word-of-mouth alone.

We won’t ask if you plan on buying and reading it; if you’re a romance reader who visits this site, you’ve already read it, or decided not to read it. But what we would ask is this:

With so much attention being paid to romantic fiction in mainstream popular culture, this is a chance to clear up misconceptions, promote certain aspects of it, cultivate new readers, and heighten awareness of the depth and richness of romance writing.

This is our chance in the popular culture spotlight.

So what is the most important thing you would like non-romance readers to know about the genre?

E.L. James's Fifty Shades Trilogy: ‹ previous | index | next ›
Morning Coffee: ‹ previous | index | next ›
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8 comments
Megan Frampton
1. MFrampton
What I wish non-romance readers would understand about romance is that romance is found in every single work of fiction: Every character has a passion that drives them. In romance, the passion is romantic love; in literary fiction, it might be a passion for knowledge, or keeping a family safe and protected through keeping its secrets, or whatever. Love drives action in books, because otherwise we wouldn't care as readers.
I also want them to know that this book is just one of many romance books, it doesn't epitomize the genre or stand for anything or is indicative of what romance readers like to read in general.
It's a compelling love story, and there are thousands of compelling love stories out there to read and enjoy.
Anna Bowling
2. AnnaBowling
I would want non-romance readers to understand that all romance novels are the same exactly the same way as all literary novels are the same, all science fiction novels are all the same, all fantasy, mystery, YA, etc...which is to say, they're not. There are as many different flavors as there are authors, and a reader for every one of them. It's a buffet. Take what tastes good to you and don't dump the rest on the floor; it's somebody else's favorite.
Christopher Morgan
3. cmorgan
I don't have the pedigree that almost everyone else on this site does in terms of what I've read in romance, and besides some of the things I've said in my articles I hope that folks realize that Fifty Shades, while entertaining, is certainly not the end all be all. There is better out there. Explore.

Oh and Guys, don't titter like a 12-year-old when you read a sex scene or see the word "penis", or euphemism there-of. It's going to happen, deal with it.
KT Grant
4. KT Grant
Wow, 750,000 people are going to find out how unsexy tampon sex is. O.o
Christopher Morgan
5. cmorgan
@ KT Grant, yeah then there was that. Managed to forget that part of the book, thanks for that...
Noelle Pierce
6. noellepierce
What I want non-romance readers to understand about romance is that there are gems as well as turds out there. Just as there are in every genre. Do NOT disparage the entire romance genre because you read a *single* horrid book in 1982.
Gina
7. ginagina
Like every genre there are gems and there's junk. Do some author research and sign up to review sites if you're a novice to romance novels. And, find a heat level with which you're comfortable. Dig for the diamonds.
KT Grant
8. pamelia
I want non-romance readers to understand that the majority of readers of romance novels are not overweight sweatsuit-wearing women who have too many cats and no sex-life. I want non-romance readers to take a gander at the truly great books in the genre before painting them all with the damning brush of "tacky sleaze". I want non-romance readers to quit falling for the trap of deriding the genre because it is (for the most part) written by women for women as if that makes it somehow less worthy as if it were like comparing scrapbooking to creating fine art. My apologies to all cat-having, sweatsuit-wearing scrapbookers out there because there really isn't anything wrong with those things either!
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