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Showing posts by: Tessa Bailey click to see Tessa Bailey's profile
Tue
Nov 26 2013 10:30am

Location, Location, Location: How Setting’s As Important As Character

Asking for Trouble by Tessa BaileyToday, author Tessa Bailey joins us to talk the importance of location. In her new release, Asking for Trouble, the hero and heroine have to be in the same place because their best friends are getting married—even though they can't stand each other. Or so they think...thanks for being here, Tessa!

A peaceful New England seashore. Post-apocalyptic London. A gritty, crime-infested Brooklyn neighborhood. The setting of a story can shape the tone, the plot and especially the journey your character takes. If a hero and heroine come face to face in a dimly-lit subway car, will the story have the same outcome as if they had met at the launch of the Space Shuttle? Unlikely. More than that, though, the story will feel different. Location transports the reader to a specific place where they will hear certain sounds, imagine the scent in the air, sense danger or even excitement.

One of the more memorable settings for a book in my recent memory is in Karen Marie Moning’s Iced. We are Dublin, Ireland, “After the Wall Crash,” meaning the invisible barrier separating human from Fae no longer exists. Human life has been lost, leaving the once lively streets of Dublin empty. Gutted. When I read this book, and I imagined our fourteen-year-old heroine, Dani, walking through looted stores, decaying buildings and holing up in abandoned homes, I could see it. I could sense the danger and sadness in every step she took through the decimated city. In this particular book, Dublin was a character all on its own. Around every corner was a new surprise, an event waiting to happen and it made the location feel like a living, breathing entity.

[Can you picture it?...]