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Showing posts by: Suleikha Snyder click to see Suleikha Snyder's profile
Fri
May 30 2014 9:30am

Sing Us a Song: Music to Make Love (and Words!) By

Opening Act by Suleikha Snyder Today we welcome author Suleikha Snyder to Heroes and Heartbreakers. Suleikha's latest release, Opening Act, is about two friends, a musician hero and a reporter heroine, who eventually discover that they are in rhythm with one another. Suleikha's here to talk about how music informs Opening Act, and her characters' progression. Thanks, Suleikha!

I’m not one of those authors that has a book playlist. In fact, I can’t even listen to music when I write, because I’ll get so occupied singing along to the tracks that I won’t get a lick of work done! Writer fail. I know. However, that doesn’t mean music isn’t a huge part of my stories—especially my latest, Opening Act, about two friends from college who’ve graduated to a whole new relationship. Music is what keeps them tied together—she’s an arts reporter for a small online newspaper, and he plays bass in a grunge band—and it’s also a reflection of who they are as individuals.

When it comes to characterization, music really is the food of love.

My hero and heroine are twentysomethings, working Millenials still figuring themselves out. So songs become shorthand for where they came from and who they want to be. John Cougar Mellencamp is the soundtrack for Adam Harper’s blue-collar childhood. Saroj came to the United States as a kid, fell in love with Nirvana, but keeps the dance beat of Punjabi bhangra on her mp3 player. Even if they don’t know themselves—even if a reader doesn’t know them fully—what they’re listening to gives you an idea of their potential.

Music can be a really valuable tool on multiple levels—not just for character backstory and depth.

[We're all in the mood for a melody...]