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Showing posts by: Sarah Hegger click to see Sarah Hegger's profile
Wed
Sep 3 2014 2:15pm

Holding Out for a Hero in the Medieval Era

Sweet Pea by Sarah HeggerToday we're joined by author Sarah Hegger, whose Sweet Bea is out this week. Sweet Bea is set during the medieval period, renowned for its knights and chivalric behavior. The realities of that time, however, are at odds with the fictional accounts, but Sarah thinks that shouldn't deter us from hoping to find our own knight. She's here to talk about why the knight myth might have started in the first place, and why we shouldn't ever stop hoping for a knight of our own. Thanks for joining us, Sarah!

One of the things that always draws me to the medieval period is the myth of the knight. The shining, conquering hero, who will vanquish all villains, cling to his code of honor and look totally yummy while doing it.

Okay, now I know that in reality they were mostly just thugs with big swords who ruled by fear and ran around thwacking things. Let’s just let history have a word here where in 1379, Sir John Arundel arrived at a convent and got them to agree to put him and his armed retinue up for a few nights. Sir John and his men reciprocated by looting the nunnery, storming the nearby church and stealing the newly married bride. They then raped her, kidnapped the nuns and took them out to sea and threw them overboard.

Which begs the question, how does the fantasy of the knight in shining armor keep going against this sort of evidence?

[Hard to keep the fantasy alive...]