<i>Riding Dirty</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Riding Dirty: Exclusive Excerpt Jill Sorenson "She wanted his mouth all over her, his skin on her skin..." <i>Christmas Brides</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Christmas Brides: Exclusive Excerpt Alexandra Hawkins, Suzanne Enoch, Elizabeth Essex and Valerie Bowman <i>Gentlemen Prefer Curves</i>: Excerpt Gentlemen Prefer Curves: Excerpt Sugar Jamison "It was him. Carter Lancaster. Her first and only love." <i>Night Sky</i>: Excerpt Night Sky: Excerpt Suzanne Brockmann and Melanie Brockmann "Oh God, I asked him, did I make you kiss me?"
From The Blog
September 20, 2014
Immortal/Mortal Love in The Shadowhunters Series
Willa aka willaful
September 19, 2014
Friday Beefcake: Foxy Flannel
Team H & H
September 19, 2014
H&H Debriefing: Give a 'Ship
Team H & H
September 19, 2014
Addicted Authors and Characters
Ciar Cullen
September 17, 2014
Benedict Cumberbatch's Darcy Scene
Megan Frampton
Showing posts by: Lia Riley click to see Lia Riley's profile
Wed
Aug 13 2014 2:00pm

Byronic Baby Daddy: Three Reasons I Adore Mr. Rochester

Upside Down by Lia Riley

Today we're joined by author Lia Riley, whose Upside Down is just out this month. Upside Down's hero isn't perfect, and he has his own issues to work through before—perhaps—finding his own HEA. Like Upside Down's Bran, Jane Eyre's Mr. Rochester has a few issues of his own, but Lia still loves him, or perhaps loves him more because of them. She's here to talk about her book boyfriend, Mr. Rochester, today. Thanks, Lia! 

Bless the book boyfriend, those dreamy larger-than-life guys who inspire us by the end of the story to try and crawl inside the page (or is that just me?). We all have our hero preferences. Maybe you adore a warrior—ready to defend his woman no matter the costs. Or perhaps your tastes run more toward down-to-earth betas, those sweethearts next door.

Me? Man, oh, man, the Byronic hero is my kryptonite.

Lord Byron, dubbed by his eventual lover, Caroline Lamb as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” lent his name to one of the most enduring classic hero archetypes. He’s often viewed as a protagonist but is also someone unstable and deeply conflicted. None of my many fictional crushes have been as long-standing as Jane Eyre’s brooding true love, Mr. Edward Fairfax Rochester, the epitome of an excellent Byronic hero. You can keep Mr. Knightley or even Mr. Darcy. I’ll take a helping of misunderstood outsider.

Rebellious? Check.

Arrogant? Check.

Angsty? Check.

Anti-social? Yep, pretty much.

Intelligent and keenly perceptive? Oh my yes.

What if we throw in passionate and darkly romantic?

Ermahgawd. . .siiiiiiiiiigh.

[What's not to love!]