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Showing posts by: Lia Riley click to see Lia Riley's profile
Tue
Dec 2 2014 4:45pm

The Unconventional Heroine: The Hardest Job in Literature?

Today we're joined by Lia Riley, whose Inside Out is out today! Inside Out is the conclusion to Lia's Off the Map series, where the heroine travels from California to Australia and ends up meeting the love of her life. Of course it's not as easy as that—especially since Lia's heroine, Talia, isn't the usual type of heroine. In writing Talia, Lia created an unconventional heroine, which is what she's talking about today. Thanks, Lia!

It’s kind of a given that all (okay, MOST) romance readers adore a tortured hero. There’s something appealing about a man with flaws, qualities that render him more human and interesting. But spare a thought for the flawed, unconventional heroines. Man, oh, man, that’s got to be one of the toughest gigs in literature.

Why is there still a double standard? Why can a hero get away with bad behavior, or act like a straight-up jerk face, while a heroine is criticized for the same qualities? These are questions that have honestly kept me awake at night. Where are the female equivalents of Mr. Rochester or Christian Grey? We don’t even have to go that far. I don’t know about you, but I’m far from perfect. I can be kind of an... ass. Or thoughtless. Or careless. Or opinionated. Or grumpy. But I’d like to think I’m someone you’d generally wish well and hope to succeed.

[We think you are too!]

Wed
Aug 13 2014 1:00pm

Byronic Baby Daddy: Three Reasons I Adore Mr. Rochester

Upside Down by Lia Riley

Today we're joined by author Lia Riley, whose Upside Down is just out this month. Upside Down's hero isn't perfect, and he has his own issues to work through before—perhaps—finding his own HEA. Like Upside Down's Bran, Jane Eyre's Mr. Rochester has a few issues of his own, but Lia still loves him, or perhaps loves him more because of them. She's here to talk about her book boyfriend, Mr. Rochester, today. Thanks, Lia! 

Bless the book boyfriend, those dreamy larger-than-life guys who inspire us by the end of the story to try and crawl inside the page (or is that just me?). We all have our hero preferences. Maybe you adore a warrior—ready to defend his woman no matter the costs. Or perhaps your tastes run more toward down-to-earth betas, those sweethearts next door.

Me? Man, oh, man, the Byronic hero is my kryptonite.

Lord Byron, dubbed by his eventual lover, Caroline Lamb as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” lent his name to one of the most enduring classic hero archetypes. He’s often viewed as a protagonist but is also someone unstable and deeply conflicted. None of my many fictional crushes have been as long-standing as Jane Eyre’s brooding true love, Mr. Edward Fairfax Rochester, the epitome of an excellent Byronic hero. You can keep Mr. Knightley or even Mr. Darcy. I’ll take a helping of misunderstood outsider.

Rebellious? Check.

Arrogant? Check.

Angsty? Check.

Anti-social? Yep, pretty much.

Intelligent and keenly perceptive? Oh my yes.

What if we throw in passionate and darkly romantic?

Ermahgawd. . .siiiiiiiiiigh.

[What's not to love!]