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Showing posts by: Kelly Jamieson click to see Kelly Jamieson's profile
Mon
Dec 5 2011 1:30pm

1, 2, 3: Ménage à Trois from Lorelei James, Megan Hart, Maya Banks, and More!

Rough, Raw, and Ready by Lorelei JamesAccording to Google, unspecified polls (whatever that means) tell us that only 24% of people have actually had a threesome. Yet it seems there are a lot of people out there who like to read romances that feature a ménage à trois. Why so popular? Is it the forbidden aspect of it? Does the addition of one more person add to the hotness?

It’s pretty commonly known that many men find the idea of two women together a hot fantasy. Even for women, the idea of being a little bicurious with another woman can be intriguing. For women readers, the appeal of two men at the same time is understandable—if one hot guy is good, two is better!

[Addition is fun!...]

Thu
Nov 10 2011 3:00pm

Worldbuilding in Contemporary Romance: Shalvis, Higgins, Janzen, and More!

Simply Irresistible by Jill ShalvisWhen we think of worldbuilding, we’re likely to think about fantasy or paranormal romance where a writer creates an entirely new world for their characters to inhabit. But worldbuilding isn’t just for fantasy; when an author writes a contemporary romance, she is building a world. A world that readers have never been to. We may all live in contemporary settings, in houses and apartments, and work in office buildings or whatever; but nobody has ever seen the world an author’s characters inhabit―because she’s making it up.

Authors know the importance of setting in fiction. Setting has even been described as “the main character” of the novel. It must be described in enough detail that the reader can experience it, but not so much detail that the reader gets bogged down in pages of description. Good worldbuilding also creates a setting that integrates with both the story and the characters.

[Welcome welcome welcome...]

Thu
Oct 20 2011 10:30am

Getting Away with Murder: Motivation from Lori Foster and Toni Blake

When Bruce Met Cyn by Lori FosterAs a reader, I like characters who aren’t perfect, characters who make mistakes and have flaws. But I still have to like those characters. So how far can a character go without losing the sympathy of a reader? Can he commit murder? Can she lie or cheat? Can he steal?

A character who steals just because he’s too lazy to get a job isn’t going to be sympathetic. On the other hand, a character who lost her job in the recession, lost her home in the sub prime mortgage meltdown, who is now homeless, who has no health insurance and whose child is sick and hungry, a character who feels humiliated and desperate to keep her family alive—it’s entirely possible this character could come across as someone we relate to and root for, even if she steals food for her family.

Most of us would definitely agree that killing is wrong. A character who commits a murder because it gives him a feeling of power and pleasure to take another life is not going to be sympathetic to readers. But what about a Navy SEAL who raids a top secret compound housing the most wanted terrorist in the world and puts two bullets into that terrorist? Would we understand and sympathize with his motivations? Would we consider him a hero?

And yet both those situations involve taking another life.

[What we forgive for love...]