<i>Hard to Fight</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Hard to Fight: Exclusive Excerpt Bella Jewel “This man has demons, all men with faces like his do.” <i>Smoke on the Water</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Smoke on the Water: Exclusive Excerpt Lori Handeland "He stilled, gaze on mine, but he didn’t stop me from touching him." <i>Lady Emily's Exotic Journey</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Lady Emily's Exotic Journey: Exclusive Excerpt Lillian Marek “I begin to think that this will be a most interesting voyage." <i>That Night with the CEO</i>: Exclusive Excerpt That Night with the CEO: Exclusive Excerpt Karen Booth “Hey, you’re the one suggesting showers. Not me.”
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Showing posts by: Julie Anne Long click to see Julie Anne Long's profile
Wed
Apr 1 2015 1:00pm

Falling for You: Fallen Women in Romance Novels from Chase, Burrowes, and More!

It Started with a Scandal by Julie Anne Long Today we're thrilled to welcome Julie Anne Long, whose latest release, It Started with a Scandal, came out yesterday. The heroine of It Started with a Scandal has a, well...scandalous...past and becomes shunned by society and her family. Julie Anne is here today to talk about scandalous, fallen women and the heroes who love them. Thanks, Julie Anne!

Raise your hand if you woke up this morning feeling absolutely flawless: You've never made a mistake, life has never handled you a little roughly, leaving you with a few metaphorical chips and cracks, you've never harbored any doubts over whether you're lovable.

I suspect your hands are still hovering somewhere around your keyboard, or firmly gripping your coffee cup. (Or wine glass. Or, in my case, square of dark chocolate.)

To be human is to be vulnerable, to doubt. Taking risks in spite of the doubts is what builds character; it's how we discover what we're truly made of. And one of the great satisfactions of being a romance author is being able to apply both experience and imagination to rock a heroine's world on its foundation, sending her toppling either through her own impulses or through the caprices of life... and then lead our fallen heroine to that place we all want to be: loved not in spite of her mistakes or the vulnerabilities she prefers to hide, but almost because of them. Because they are, in fact, what make her perfect for the hero, and what makes him perfect for her.

[Imperfection can sometimes be perfect...]

Tue
Apr 1 2014 3:00pm

Rhett Butler, Colonel Brandon, and More: The Allure of the Older Hero in Romance Novels

Between the Devil and Ian Eversea by Julie Anne LongToday we're joined by author Julie Anne Long, whose Between the Devil and Ian Eversea has just been released. Julie Anne has written many heroes, including the titular Ian Eversea, but was inspired by older heroes when she wrote the Duke of Falconridge in What I Did For a Duke. Julie Anne is here to discuss the appeal of older heroes. Thanks, Julie Anne!

The other day I was talking with a friend about historical romance epics—those sweeping, deliciously fat tomes that in all likelihood influenced, if only tangentially, the writing of a generation of romance authors, myself included. Books like Gone with the Wind, The Thorn Birds, and specifically in my case, Through a Glass Darkly (one of those immensely satisfying dynastic romances brought to us by the '80s, and one of the books responsible for my career, in that I was captivated by it). They had in common richly realized historical settings, casts of dozens, generations' worth of passion and drama. Rich, rich veins of angst ran through all of them.

And interestingly, the ones we remembered off the top of our heads all feature older heroes and younger heroines.

Much older heroes and much younger heroines.

Does a historical saga require a May/December romance to be considered sweeping and epic and unforgettable? Probably not. Still, it was an intriguing realization.

[We do love our May/December trope...]