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Showing posts by: Julie Anne Long click to see Julie Anne Long's profile
Tue
Apr 1 2014 3:00pm

Rhett Butler, Colonel Brandon, and More: The Allure of the Older Hero in Romance Novels

Between the Devil and Ian Eversea by Julie Anne LongToday we're joined by author Julie Anne Long, whose Between the Devil and Ian Eversea has just been released. Julie Anne has written many heroes, including the titular Ian Eversea, but was inspired by older heroes when she wrote the Duke of Falconridge in What I Did For a Duke. Julie Anne is here to discuss the appeal of older heroes. Thanks, Julie Anne!

The other day I was talking with a friend about historical romance epics—those sweeping, deliciously fat tomes that in all likelihood influenced, if only tangentially, the writing of a generation of romance authors, myself included. Books like Gone with the Wind, The Thorn Birds, and specifically in my case, Through a Glass Darkly (one of those immensely satisfying dynastic romances brought to us by the '80s, and one of the books responsible for my career, in that I was captivated by it). They had in common richly realized historical settings, casts of dozens, generations' worth of passion and drama. Rich, rich veins of angst ran through all of them.

And interestingly, the ones we remembered off the top of our heads all feature older heroes and younger heroines.

Much older heroes and much younger heroines.

Does a historical saga require a May/December romance to be considered sweeping and epic and unforgettable? Probably not. Still, it was an intriguing realization.

[We do love our May/December trope...]