<i>Mad, Bad, and Dangerous in Plaid</i>: Excerpt Mad, Bad, and Dangerous in Plaid: Excerpt Suzanne Enoch "Dunnae throw down yer wee glove unless ye’re ready fer someone to take(it) up" Read & Win: Sarah Morgan's <i>First Time in Forever</i> Read & Win: Sarah Morgan's First Time in Forever Sarah Morgan Read an excerpt and enter for a chance to win a copy of your own! <i>Vampires Never Cry Wolf</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Vampires Never Cry Wolf: Exclusive Excerpt Sara Humphreys "Looks like there are lots of things you don’t know about me, Ms. Pemberton." <i>Heartbreak Cove</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Heartbreak Cove: Exclusive Excerpt Lily Everett "It was all he could do not to use the leverage to reel her in for a kiss."
From The Blog
February 27, 2015
Friday Beefcake: Eddie Redmayne
Team H & H
February 27, 2015
Comedic Sci-Fi Romance
Heather Massey
February 26, 2015
No-Catch Heroes from Friends, Love Actually, and More!
Roe Valentine
February 26, 2015
Best Reads of February 2015
Team H & H
February 25, 2015
Anne Bishop’s Others Series
Sahara Hoshi
Showing posts by: Janni Lee Simner click to see Janni Lee Simner's profile
Tue
Apr 12 2011 4:00pm

Arranged Marriages and Dystopian Fiction

Matched and The GiverI was recently reading Ally Condie’s dystopic young adult novel Matched, in which the tightly controlled Society the protagonist lives in determines everything about her life, right down to who she’s to court and marry. This isn’t a new trope in dystopic YA—it can be easily traced back to Lois Lowry’s The Giver at least, probably goes back much farther, and appears in adult dystopic fiction as well.

As I read, I found myself thinking about how unlike in a traditional romance, where arranged marriages can at least sometimes turn into true love, in dystopic fiction arranged marriage is much more often used as a quick and easy sign that a society is broken—because if you’re being told to marry, the world you live in has to be pretty bad, right?

[It’s never been that simple, historically...]