<i>Forever His Texas Bride</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Forever His Texas Bride: Exclusive Excerpt Linda Broday "With a low moan, she slid her hand around his neck, drawing him closer." <i>Make Me Stay</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Make Me Stay: Exclusive Excerpt Jaci Burton "She wants a real, permanent, forever kind of love." <i>Midnight Wrangler</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Midnight Wrangler: Exclusive Excerpt Cat Johnson "He thought about doing more than kissing her." <i>For His Pleasure</i>: Exclusive Excerpt For His Pleasure: Exclusive Excerpt Suzanne Rock “Stop worrying and enjoy the moment.”
From The Blog
November 21, 2015
Gothic Romance Movie Night: 3 Classics
Lauren Smith
November 20, 2015
Love for Bibliophiles in Whispers in the Reading Room
Maggie Boyd
November 19, 2015
A Ranking of the Lunar Chronicles Series Couples
November 18, 2015
Victoria Dahl Plays Your Heartstrings Harlot
Rebekah Weatherspoon
November 18, 2015
Romantic Suspense to Get Your Heart Racing
Dolly Sickles
Showing posts by: Janni Lee Simner click to see Janni Lee Simner's profile
Apr 12 2011 4:00pm

Arranged Marriages and Dystopian Fiction

Matched and The GiverI was recently reading Ally Condie’s dystopic young adult novel Matched, in which the tightly controlled Society the protagonist lives in determines everything about her life, right down to who she’s to court and marry. This isn’t a new trope in dystopic YA—it can be easily traced back to Lois Lowry’s The Giver at least, probably goes back much farther, and appears in adult dystopic fiction as well.

As I read, I found myself thinking about how unlike in a traditional romance, where arranged marriages can at least sometimes turn into true love, in dystopic fiction arranged marriage is much more often used as a quick and easy sign that a society is broken—because if you’re being told to marry, the world you live in has to be pretty bad, right?

[It’s never been that simple, historically...]