<i>The Highland Dragon's Lady</i>: Exclusive Excerpt The Highland Dragon's Lady: Exclusive Excerpt Isabel Cooper "His lean body snapped to attention and his eyes blazed with silver fire." <i>Rocked by the Billionaire</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Rocked by the Billionaire: Exclusive Excerpt Mandy Baxter "He (looked) so self-possessed, so goddamned gorgeous after so many years..." Now Win <i>This</i>: Kylie Scott’s <i>Lead</i>! Now Win This: Kylie Scott’s Lead! Team H & H Enter for a chance to win a paperback copy of Kylie Scott's Lead! <i>The Duke's Guide to Correct Behavior</i>: Excerpt The Duke's Guide to Correct Behavior: Excerpt Megan Frampton "She was very far from reputable at this moment, she had to admit..."
From The Blog
November 21, 2014
Friday Beefcake: NaNoWriMo Reward
Team H & H
November 21, 2014
Best Reads of November 2014
Team H & H
November 21, 2014
3 Reasons We Already Love Pitch Perfect 2
Jennifer Proffitt
November 20, 2014
Different Types of E-Readers
Lynne Connolly
November 19, 2014
Favorite Christmas Stories
Miranda Neville, Carolyn Jewel, Grace Burrowes and Shana Galen
Showing posts by: Hope Tarr click to see Hope Tarr's profile
Wed
May 9 2012 10:45am

Author Hope Tarr on Real-life Historical Heroines Who Busted Balls and Broke Outta the Box

Tempting by Hope TarrWho doesn’t love a kick-ass heroine? Today, author Hope Tarr joins us to relate some tales of real-life kick-ass historical heroines, some of whom could have served as models for Hope’s heroines. Hope’s delicious book Tempting is now available at a low price for your e-reader. Thanks for joining us, Hope!

Authors writing historical romance today are frequently called to task for sacrificing historical accuracy to modern sensibilities, authenticity to character-building and plot. There’s even a term for it, coined by Jane Litte of Dear Author: the “mistorical”—shorthand for mistaken historical. Starting in 2011, the popular review site uses “mistorical” as a tag to designate “all manner of historically inauthentic and inaccurate books on the blog—a catchall term that can be used for books of any time period or any type of mistaken, misused, mythologized, missing, or otherwise inaccurately portrayed historicism.”

I like the “mistorical” designation. I like it a lot. It also brings up a question. Are historical romance authors who write strong, dare I say ballsy, heroines fudging facts—and writing mistoricals—in the service of pandering to the popular taste?

[Let’s discuss...]