H&H Reads <i>A Breath of Scandal</i> (5 of 6) H&H Reads A Breath of Scandal (5 of 6) Elizabeth Essex Ready to be reckless? Join us for a read-along of Elizabeth Essex's A Breath of Scandal <i>The House on Blackberry Hill</i>: Excerpt The House on Blackberry Hill: Excerpt Donna Alward "He felt a shiver of anticipation that had...everything to do with the client." <i>The Billionaire Biker</i>: Exclusive Excerpt The Billionaire Biker: Exclusive Excerpt Jackie Ashenden "Her best friend. Her first lover. And the boy who’d left her..." <i>No Sunshine When She's Gone</i>: Exclusive Excerpt No Sunshine When She's Gone: Exclusive Excerpt Kate Angell "He liked holding her, he realized..."
From The Blog
April 16, 2014
Hot Small-Town Contemporaries
Jennifer Proffitt
April 16, 2014
Falling in Love with Paranormal Romance
A. C. Arthur
April 15, 2014
Sacrificing Heroines from Higgins, Carr, and More
Leigh Davis
April 14, 2014
Top 5 Romance Novels Influenced by the Bard
Janga
April 14, 2014
Tom Hiddleston Asks “May I Feel?” in Honor of National Poetry Month
Megan Frampton
Showing posts by: Hope Tarr click to see Hope Tarr's profile
Wed
May 9 2012 11:45am

Tempting by Hope TarrWho doesn’t love a kick-ass heroine? Today, author Hope Tarr joins us to relate some tales of real-life kick-ass historical heroines, some of whom could have served as models for Hope’s heroines. Hope’s delicious book Tempting is now available at a low price for your e-reader. Thanks for joining us, Hope!

Authors writing historical romance today are frequently called to task for sacrificing historical accuracy to modern sensibilities, authenticity to character-building and plot. There’s even a term for it, coined by Jane Litte of Dear Author: the “mistorical”—shorthand for mistaken historical. Starting in 2011, the popular review site uses “mistorical” as a tag to designate “all manner of historically inauthentic and inaccurate books on the blog—a catchall term that can be used for books of any time period or any type of mistaken, misused, mythologized, missing, or otherwise inaccurately portrayed historicism.”

I like the “mistorical” designation. I like it a lot. It also brings up a question. Are historical romance authors who write strong, dare I say ballsy, heroines fudging facts—and writing mistoricals—in the service of pandering to the popular taste?

[Let’s discuss...]