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Showing posts by: Dani Collins click to see Dani Collins's profile
Mon
Dec 9 2013 3:30pm

The Arranged Trope: The Convenience of a Marriage of Convenience

Today we're joined by author Dani Collins, whose More Than a Convenient Marriage? and No Longer Forbidden? have been released in a special two-for-one package this month. Dani is a long-time fan of marriage of convenience, and is here to talk about one of romance's most universal tropes. Thanks for being here, Dani!

As a reader, it was love at first sight with me and the Marriage of Convenience trope. When I first started reading romance at thirteen, category was still closing the door on sex. In the rare cases that the heroine wasn’t a virgin until she married, she had miscarried her secret baby after her affair with the hero five years ago. She, of course, was too heartbroken to give herself to anyone else until he rolled back into her life.

As an author, I can appreciate how the Marriage of Convenience was a godsend to the romance writer of the day. Today it’s hard to keep the hero and heroine out of bed until page fifty, but back then you couldn’t get them into it without a ring and how do you maintain conflict after they’ve declared their love and walked down the aisle? Enter the provisions of a will, the decree of a king, or the desperate and pregnant widow.

[Convenient, and primed for drama...]