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Showing posts by: Carolyn Jewel click to see Carolyn Jewel's profile
Mon
Feb 6 2012 10:30am

Pencil on Fire!: Carolyn Jewel’s Inspirations for Not Wicked Enough

Doorknob image by takomabibelot via FlickrToday, author Carolyn Jewel joins us to explain what faulty apertures  and a writing implement have to do with her upcoming release, Not Wicked Enough.

What do these two things have in common?

—A doorknob malfunction

—A flaming pencil

I will immediately end your suspense. Both of these things appear in my historical romance, Not Wicked Enough (Berkley Sensation, out Feb. 7). I don’t think it’s possible, or even desirable, to write a historical novel that is completely and infallibly accurate; there’s just no way to be sure about everything. All the same, I do like to be more accurate than not.  For my flaming pencil scene, I already had primary historical documentation that sparked the idea. The doorknob malfunction required separate research to be sure my idea was possible.

[On doorknobs and pencils...]

Tue
Jun 21 2011 11:00am

Why I Love Stephanie Plum

One for the Money by Janet EvanovichI grew up in a household with two rabid mystery readers, my father and sister. This means I have read my share of mystery novelists. To name only a very few: Arthur Conan-Doyle, Agatha Christie, John D. MacDonald, Elmore Leonard, and Sue Grafton. I like mysteries a lot and read them to this day.

Romance, however, has long been my go-to genre. It’s what I read the most and the genre I always come back to sooner than later. In fact, it’s the elements of romance that I most miss in other books I read. Over the years, I’ve come to the conclusion that one of the major reasons for my Romance love is that Romances tend not to dismiss or omit the female view.

[And you don’t want to miss out on Stephanie Plum...]

Sun
Mar 6 2011 3:00pm

Genus, Genre, Genius: On Reading Romance

Fiction Genres chartOver at this other blog—oh all right, John Scalzi’s WhateverBrandon Sanderson had an interesting guest post about “Post Modernism in Fantasy.” Yes, I know this is supposed to be about Romance. I’ll get there. I promise.

In the meantime, oh, my gosh! Brandon Sanderson is a total academic geek! W00t for  English grad school geeks! While I was getting my MA in English, I, too, was required to read all about deconstruction. At first, the concept made my brain hurt, but, as with many difficult subjects, if you do the reading and pay attention in class, after a bit you catch on.

Deconstruction for the Rest of Us

If you’re interested, here’s an amusing and even useful look at “How to deconstruct Just About Anything.” If you just want to laugh at grad students in the English Department, there’s this. But beware, English grad students are everywhere, and they understand why you’re doing what you’re doing not to mention what you really meant by it. We’re scary that way.

[I are smart! . . .]

Fri
Feb 18 2011 6:05pm
Original Story

The King’s Dragon

Parade Grounds, Gaizen Palace, Tallend Province of the Fensic Empire

Magic pressed on Mair’s heart when Dal Atul emerged from the barracks at the far side of the parade grounds. As she watched him, the sensation enfolded her, slid through her, around her, deep and mysterious. The moment of recognition, when it hit, shook her so hard her breath stopped. So hard she couldn’t hear what the others were whispering. Nothing existed except Atul, that old, savage magic, and her conviction that her life had just re-formed itself into a new and terrible shape.

This awful sense of desperation and futility had to spring from fear she told herself. What could her fast-beating pulse mean but that, like the others, she was afraid of the king’s Dragon? By reputation alone, he was not a man who would ever be the subject of romantic fantasy. Today’s tourney was for the entertainment of the Tallend delegation, but it was no accident the participants were soldiers. Dangerous soldiers. Each one chosen from among Veren’s best, including, of course, from members of the King’s Own Guard. Men such as Dal Atul.

[Like the sneak peek? Read the full story here.]

Sat
Feb 12 2011 5:05pm
Original Story

Sneak Peek: The King’s Dragon by Carolyn Jewel

We couldn't give you all the good stuff at once!  Okay, maybe a smidge.  Here's a tease of  The King's Dragon, an original story by Carolyn Jewel coming to Heroes and Heartbreakers soon.

 

The King's Dragon

Parade Grounds, Gaizen Palace, Tallend Province of the Fensic Empire

Magic pressed on Mair’s heart when Dal Atul emerged from the barracks at the far side of the parade grounds. As she watched him, the sensation enfolded her, slid through her, around her, deep and mysterious. The moment of recognition, when it hit, shook her so hard her breath stopped. So hard she couldn’t hear what the others were whispering. Nothing existed except Atul, that old, savage magic, and her conviction that her life had just re-formed itself into a new and terrible shape. . .


Carolyn Jewel lives in Northern California. She writes Romance and bakes a lot except when she is at the day job. You can find her on the web at www.carolynjewel.com, on Twitter and on Facebook. You can find her books online and at fine bookstores everywhere.

Fri
Feb 11 2011 6:00am

Author Anecdote: Carolyn Jewel Remembers

When I was in my twenties, I lived in Berkeley, California and worked in downtown Oakland. I made frequent visits to the Holmes Bookstore in Oakland, which, happily for me, was only a few blocks from where I worked. I don’t live there anymore, but if I wanted to, I could make the drive in under two hours.

[Memories . . . ]