<i>Tangled</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Tangled: Exclusive Excerpt Kate Douglas "The need was so primal, so visceral, it left her shaken..." <i>The Girl from Summer Hill</i>: Exclusive Excerpt The Girl from Summer Hill: Exclusive Excerpt Jude Deveraux "He stood there staring at her, saying nothing..." <i>Wicked Heart</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Wicked Heart: Exclusive Excerpt Leisa Rayven "I think if I kissed you right now, we’d barely make it through..." <i>Much Ado About Highlanders</i>: Exclusive Excerpt Much Ado About Highlanders: Exclusive Excerpt May McGoldrick "Violet-blue eyes stared at him with disbelief that quickly..."
From The Blog
April 29, 2016
Captain America vs. Iron Man: Which Side Are You On?
Pen Singleton and Sahara Hoshi
April 28, 2016
At Home: Julian Fellowes’ Belgravia, Episode 4
Naz Keynejad
April 28, 2016
Why Prince Songs Make a Perfect Soundtrack for Romance Novels
Abigail Strom
April 28, 2016
Best Reads of April 2016
Team H & H
April 25, 2016
Love, Lies, and Spies: Teen Regency Done Right
Carol Malcolm
Showing posts by: Cara McKenna click to see Cara McKenna's profile
Thu
Apr 17 2014 11:00am

Gorgeous and Gritty: The Appeal of Gritty Romance in Skye Warren’s Wanderlust

Hard Time by Cara McKenna

Today we welcome Cara McKenna to Heroes and Heartbreakers. Cara’s Hard Time came out earlier this week, and it features a convicted felon hero who courts the librarian heroine via clandestine love letters. An ex-con falling for a librarian is not the easiest tale to tell, and comes with some pretty intense moments. Cara is here to share some of the reasons (and recommendations) that gritty is oh-so great. Thanks, Cara!

Editor's note: Please be aware that his post contains discussion of rape and dubious consent.

Darren, Michigan, is a struggling former factory town, home to my most recent book, Hard Time, and the fictional Cousins Correctional Facility. Darren’s a pretty bleak little working-class city, short on both industry and hope. Recently, I asked friends and readers on Twitter what their favorite gritty romances from the past year were, and got loads of excellent recommendations. I picked four that I intended to read and reference in this post, but then something messed that plan all up.

A something called Wanderlust, by Skye Warren.

I’d not read Warren before, but a friend came over for pizza and gossip and told me about it. I caught key words—dubious consent, trucker, kidnapping—and promptly one-clicked.

The trouble with my original plan is that since I started Wanderlust I haven’t been able to get it out of my head. I don’t want it out of my head yet, like a flavor I’m a little worried I won’t ever taste again, so I’m hesitant to wash it away with some other meal, no matter how lovely the new tastes might be. It’s beautiful, and it’s so, so, fucked. And wonderful. And fucked. And so not for everyone. Let me explain some of the ways in which it’s fucked.

[Would you say it's f***ed?...]